As to Lasker there was less than expected, but Michael could inspect only a fraction of the total. At least he could record 25 letters of Lasker to W.A.T. Schelfhout, moreover there were quite a lot of totally unknown photos. The alleged Lasker diary exists as well, but the contents are poor. Lasker received it as a present from his sister Philchen at Christmas 1912, and in 1914 he had started to write entries.

The guestbook of the Schmid family is worth a special mention, as it is a distinguished collector's item containing numerous prominent visitors, among them all the world champions after Alekhine, apart from Gary Kasparov only (Max Euwe has been in Bamberg several times).

Michael Negele has written an excellent article (11 pages!) on collector's passion, his visit to Bamberg and Lothar Schmid's treasures, including some background stories:
Sind Sammler glückliche Menschen? oder Der Fuchs und die Trauben, in: SCHACH 2/2016, p.46-56.

 

We still show some photos from the previous day:

 

In the community hall of the Israelitische Kultusgemeinde (IKG) Bamberg
Helmut Pfleger gave a lecture on the Chess Olympiad Tel Aviv 1964.

 

 

Prof. Peter Krausenek (Chess Club 1868 Bamberg) and
Martin Arieh Rudolph, branch manager of the IKG Bamberg

 


Helmut Pfleger had also brought along his board price, an extremely rare collector's item:

 

Price for the best players - special issue cover and stamp
on the occasion of the Chess Olympiad 1964

 




Autographs of the contestants
larger version

 

 

The following four photos show important "chess places" in Bamberg:

 

The hat shop of Hans Holland, meanwhile in the third generation.
(In the 1950s Hans Holland II was - behind Lothar Schmid - the No 2 of the
SC Bamberg, and the scholar Helmut Pfleger was a permanent guest there.
The chess board was always waiting under the counter.)

 

 

For a long time the (chess) Café Müller was a contact point
for Bamberg chess players ...

 

 

... and the Restaurant "Wilde Rose" the first home of the Bamberg chess club.

 

 

Last but not least Hainstraße 51

 

 

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